PlanetLab History

  • March 2002: Larry Peterson (Princeton) and David Culler (UC Berkeley and Intel Research) organize an "underground" meeting of researchers interested in planetary-scale network services, and propose PlanetLab as a community testbed. The meeting, hosted by Intel Research - Berkeley, draws 30 researchers from MIT, Washington, Rice, Berkeley, Princeton, Columbia, Duke, CMU, and Utah. David Tennenhouse (Intel Research) agrees to seed-fund the project with 100 machines.

  • June 2002: Brent Chun and Timothy Roscoe (Intel Research), Eric Fraser (UC Berkeley), and Mike Wawrzoniak (Princeton) bring up first PlanetLab nodes at Intel Research - Berkeley, UC Berkeley, and Princeton. The initial system (dubbed Version 0.5) leverages the Ganglia monitoring service and the RootStock installation mechanism from the Millennium cluster project.

  • August 2002: Nearly 80 network system researchers meet at CMU the day before the SIGCOMM '02 conference to learn about PlanetLab and discuss its general architecture.

  • October 2002: Initial deployment of 100 nodes at 42 sites is complete. Operational support (including www.planet-lab.org) moves to Intel's Distributed Systems Lab (DSL) in Oregon, under the direction of Mic Bowman.

  • October 2002: Verion 1.0 of the PlanetLab software, with support for vserver-based virtual machines and safe raw sockets, is deployed. Version 1.0 is jointly developed by implementation teams at Intel Research - Berkeley, Intel DSL, and Princeton.

  • October 2002: Initial paper describing PlanetLab and its goals is presented by Peterson, Culler, Roscoe, and Tom Anderson (Washington) at the HotNets workshop in Princeton.

  • December 2002: Network systems researchers meet at MIT the day after the 5th Symposium on Operating System Design and Implementation (OSDI) to provide further input into PlanetLab's design. Several research groups report their early experiences running wide-area services on PlanetLab.

  • February 2003: PlanetLab nodes come on-line at three PoPs of Internet2's Abilene backbone. All 11 Abilene PoPs host PlanetLab nodes by the end of 2003.

  • June 2003: HP joins PlanetLab, and along with Intel, Princeton, UC Berkeley, and the University of Washington publicly announce their intent to create a joint academic/industrial Consortium to oversee the further expansion and development of PlanetLab.

  • September 2003: NSF announces a $4.5M award to Princeton, UC Berkeley, and Washington for the purpose of supporting and enhancing PlanetLab.

  • September 2003: PlanetLab passes the 200 node mark.

  • October 2003: Researchers meet at RPI the day before 19th Symposium on Operating System Principles (SOSP) to continue their discussion about PlanetLab's design, and report results of network services deployed on PlanetLab.

  • December 2003: PlanetLab passes the 300 node mark.

  • January 2004: Princeton, Berkeley, and Washington formally create PlanetLab Consortium, with Intel and HP as Charter commercial members. Princeton hosts the Consortium, with Peterson named as its Director. Operational responsibility for PlanetLab moves from Intel to Princeton.

  • January 2004: Verion 2.0 of the PlanetLab software, with support for dynamic slices, is deployed.

  • February 2004: First PlanetLab nodes come up on CANARIE, the Canadian research network. CANARIE nodes are donated by Intel.

  • April 2004: Researchers meet at HP Labs the day after the 1st Symposium on Network System Design and Implementation (NSDI) to continue their discussion about PlanetLab's design, and report results of network services deployed on PlanetLab. A paper describing PlanetLab's architecture is presented at NSDI.

  • May 2004: European PlanetLab meeting is hosted by Cambridge University (UK), with representatives from more than 30 European institutions in attendance. In addition to a survey of research using PlanetLab throughout Europe, options for hosting a regional support team in Europe are explored.

  • July 2004: PlanetLab passes the 400 node mark.

  • August 2004: First PlanetLab nodes come up on the Rede Nacional de Ensino e Pesquisa (RNP), the Brazilian National Education and Research Network. RNP nodes are donated by HP and Intel.

  • September 2004: PlanetLab is featured in Intel CTO Pat Gelsinger's keynote address at the Intel Developers Forum (IDF). Intel and HP announce plans to explore commercialization opportunities with respect to PlanetLab.

  • September 2004: Asian PlanetLab meeting is hosted by KAIST in Seoul, South Korea.

  • December 2004: CERNET, the Chinese Education and Research Network, joins PlanetLab. CERNET nodes are donated by Intel and HP.

  • December 2004: PlanetLab passes the 500 node mark.

  • September 2005: PlanetLab passes the 600 node mark.

  • October 2005: EPFL in Lausanne Switzerland hosts a "PlanetLab Everywhere" meeting. The attendees discuss "private PlanetLabs" and how to federate them.

  • May 2006: HP Labs hosts a PlanetLab meeting focused on federation. Mark Huang (Princeton) demonstrates MyPLC, a packaging of the PlanetLab software for the purpose of instantiating private PlanetLabs.

  • September 2006: PlanetLab passes the 700 node mark.

  • September 2006: A paper describing VINI, a layer-2 variant of PlanetLab, is presented at SIGCOMM.

  • April 2007: Version 4.0 of the PlanetLab software, based on MyPLC, is deployed.

  • June 2007: First ROADS (Real Overlays and Distributed Systems) workshop held in Belem Brazil. Second workshop scheduled for July in Warsaw Poland.

  • June 2007: PlanetLab passes the 800 node mark.

  • July 2007: PlanetLab federates with the OneLab project, which begins to support "PlanetLab - Europe".

  • March 2008: PlanetLab bibliography updated to include over 180 academic papers.

  • May 2008: First PlanetLab Developer's Meeting held at Princeton. Attended by participants from the US, Japan, France, Israel, and Sweden.

  • October 2008: A prototype implementation of the GENI interfaces to PlanetLab functionality is made available.

  • January 2009: PlanetLab, Google, and the Open Technology Institute announce a joint effort to launch Measurement-Lab.

  • March 2011: FCC announces use of Measurement-Lab in support of US broadband mapping project (broadband.gov).

  • September 2011: VICCI comes on-line with clusters at Princeton, Georgia Tech, Stanford, and the University of Washington.

  • June 2012: IPv6 supported on Measurement-Lab.

  • July 2012: A 5th VICCI site, at the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems, comes on-line.